CHANNEL FOLK - STEPHANIE & LEONIE CLARKE



Cassette only.


Side 1:

1. Blue Grass Lullaby (Pearson) Copyright Control
2. Sailing (Calder) Eron Enterprises
3. Appleseed Johnny (trad. arr. S. Clarke) Eron Enterprises
4. Watching The Sky (Pearson) On Stage Music
5. Pack Up Your Sorrows (Marden/Farina) Ryerson Music Pub.
6. Devoted To You (B & F Bryant) Acuff-Rose
7. Streets of London (Ralph McTell) Essex Music
8. Bye Bye Love (B & F Bryant) Acuff-Rose

Side 2:

1. Leaving On a Jet Plane (John Denver) Harmony Music
2. She Was Young (trad. arr. S. Clarke) Eron Enterprises
3. You've Got a Friend (Carole King) Screen Gems - Columbia
4. O My Love (Pearson) On Stage Music
5.Satin and Silk (Calder) Eron Enterprises
6. The Last Thing On My Mind (Tom Paxton) Harmony Music
7. This Will Be Our Last Song Together (Neil Sedaka) Warner Bros.


Liner notes from ERON 010 :

STEPHANIE & LEONIE CLARKE
First played to pensioners when they were aged only 11 and 12, as a quartet with their similarly aged girl cousins. The Clarke sisters soon learned that folk clubs offered the best route to success and, as a duo, changed their repertoire to folk songs with the emphasis on humour and cheerful ballads. Once accepted at folk clubs, initially as a novelty, they were soon booked at concerts and festivals to support celebrated artistes such as Stephane Grappelli, Ian Campbell Folk Group, John Renbourn, Davey Graham, Mariners and others, at concert halls in Britain and Luxembourg, where they gave their first television performance. They are now able to adapt their repertoire to both folk and commercial 'pop' audiences.
This cassette records a performance by the girls on board the Sealink train and passenger ferry m.v. "VORTIGERN" at Dover on 23rd April 1977.
Stephanie and Leonie have recorded tracks with other artistes on albums which are still available as collector's items. "FOLK IN SANDWICH" and "TRAVELLING FOLK" which commemorate their performances at the Sandwich Festival and the European Parliament folk club concerts in Luxembourg respectively.
These records, and others in the ERON series, may be purchased from ERON RECORDS,
27 Balmoral Road,
Kingsdown,
Deal, Kent,
Great Britain.

VORTIGERN
The Sealink train and passenger ferry m.v. "VORTIGERN" is named after a king of the Belgic tribe the Cantiaci, which first settled in South-east Britain in about 100 BC. Later the area they occupied became known as Kent and the County town Canterbury (city of the Cantii). Julius Caesar considered the folk of Kent to be by far the most civilised inhabitants of Britain. After the Romans left the Picts and Scots caused much trouble and Vortigern, now elected nominal King of the British during the emergency, applied in vain for aid from Rome. He then turned for help from the Angles, Saxons and Jutes who had become unified in Northern Germany.
After defeating the Scottish invaders these mercenaries later turned on their employer and, in AD 449, the Jutish brothers Hengest (sometimes misspelt as Hengist) and Horsa landed at Thanet. Vortigern was unable to prevent this illegal landing and legend says that he was so captivated by Hengest's beautiful daughter Rowena that he bartered for her half his Kingdom to Hengest who then became the first 'English' King of Kent in 455 AD.
It is natural, therefore, that Sealink named the "VORTIGERN's" sister ships "HENGIST" and "HORSA". The "VORTIGERN" plies mainly between Dover and Dunkirk carrying passengers, freight and the nightly sleeper train which runs from London (Victoria) to Brussels and Paris.

Apparently it was mainly sold on channel ferries. Twelve of the fifteen songs were later issued as an LP on the Stereo Gold Award label (as "Friendly Folk" by "The Clarke Sisters" with the number MER 429) but I'm not sure if these were simply reissued or if they were re-recorded.

Neil and I suppose the reason it was only a cassette was because this was more likely to sell to people as an "impulse buy" souvenir of their ferry trip, as it could slip more easily into a handbag or pocket than an LP!

Liner notes from MER 429:

"Stephanie and Leonie Clarke, sisters aged 19 and 18 respectively, first began singing when only 11 and 12 as a quartet with their similarly aged girl cousins. After a booking at Deal Folksong Club the Clarke sisters decided that their best route to success was a folk duo; they changed their repetoire to folk songs with the emphasis on humour and cheerful ballads. Once accepted at folk clubs - initially probably only as a novelty - they were soon booked for concerts and festivals; they made their own arrangements of more commercial material but always included a few traditional songs.
They were soon booked to support celebrated artistes such as Stephane Grappelli, John Renbourn Band (Pentangle II), Davey Graham, Ian Campbell Folk Group, The Mariners, etc., at concerts and festivals in Britain and Luxembourg where they gave their first television performance. They subequently performed on Southern Indepenent Television but have temporarily abandoned the stage to immerse themselves in examinations prior to entering universities. They hope this record will encourage buyers to venture into their local folk club. Stephanie and Leonie have recorded tracks with other artistes on albums which are still available as collector's items: "Folk in Sandwich" and "Travelling Folk" which commemorate their performances at the Sandwich Festival and the European Parliament Folk Club concerts in Luxembourg respectively. The girls' first solo album "Channel Folk" was issued as a cassette containing all the tracks on this album plus 3 more and are sold mainly on the Sealink
cross-channel ferries."



Thank you to Neil Murray for the information on this release, and Robert Simpson for the scans of the insert.